California is the only place where a recall of a governor has made the ballot twice.,

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

What is a recall and how does it work?

Sept. 14, 2021, 7:14 p.m. ET

Sept. 14, 2021, 7:14 p.m. ET

By Sona Patel

Larry Elder campaigning in Monterey Park on Monday.Credit…Alex Welsh for The New York Times

Besides this effort to recall Gov. Newsom, only one other attempted recall of a California governor, Gray Davis, has ever reached an election. And California is the only place where a recall of a governor has made the ballot twice. So how does the process work?

A recall petition must be signed by enough registered voters to equal 12 percent of the turnout in the last election for governor. The organizers do not need to give a reason for the recall, but they often do. The petition must include at least 1 percent of the last vote for the office in at least five counties. Proponents have 160 days to gather their signatures.

The signatures must then be examined and verified by the California secretary of state. If the petitions meet the threshold — 1,495,709 valid signatures in this case — voters who signed have 30 business days to change their minds.