U.S News

White House to Name Rosenworcel as F.C.C.’s First Female Leader

Jessica Rosenworcel, the acting chairwoman of the powerful regulator, campaigned vigorously for a permanent appointment.,

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

Supported by

Continue reading the main story

President Biden is expected to nominate Jessica Rosenworcel, the acting chairwoman of the Federal Communications Commission, to the permanent job this week, putting her on track to become the first woman to lead the agency, a person familiar with the process said.

If she is confirmed by the Senate, Ms. Rosenworcel would lead an agency whose responsibilities include ensuring that millions of Americans have internet access. The F.C.C. promotes competition among providers, scrutinizes mergers between telecommunications and broadcast companies, and regulates communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable.

The nomination reflects the Biden administration’s commitment to restoring net neutrality rules, which promote competition in part by barring internet providers from blocking certain content, slowing its delivery or letting clients pay more to have it delivered faster. The F.C.C. adopted the rules during the Obama administration but rolled them back under the Trump administration.

A person familiar with the process confirmed that Mr. Biden was expected to announce Ms. Rosenworcel’s nomination later on Tuesday. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.

The president has come under growing pressure in recent weeks to fill two open spots at the F.C.C.: the permanent leader of the agency and the seat on the five-member commission that Ms. Rosenworcel vacated when she became the acting chairwoman.

Both positions must be confirmed by the Senate, a process plagued by delays and political gamesmanship. If Ms. Rosenworcel and the next member of the commission are not confirmed before the end of the year, Republicans could gain a de facto majority. The commission is currently deadlocked, with two Democratic and two Republican members.

“There’s no historical precedent and pretty wide frustration from the consumer side that we haven’t had an agency able to do anything about something as important to people’s lives as broadband access,” said Ernesto Falcon, the senior legislative counsel at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a public-interest law firm working on digital civil liberties. The group has pushed the F.C.C. to move faster on expanding access to underserved communities, a goal that has taken on increased urgency during the coronavirus pandemic.

“When you have wide-scale monopolization on broadband access and a sidelined agency, clearly it’s the industry that benefits,” Mr. Falcon said.

Though the F.C.C.’s actions directly affect companies making up one-sixth of the U.S. economy, it has no authority over communications on social media, where rampant political misinformation has made the big platforms a regulatory priority.

When asked in an interview why she wanted to lead the commission, Ms. Rosenworcel said, “It’s the future of our economy, and I think we have to make sure across the board that women are represented, including at the top.”

Ms. Rosenworcel, 50, campaigned vigorously for the permanent job, with female members of Congress, five labor unions, 14 human rights groups and two dozen Senate Democrats lobbying Mr. Biden to nominate her. In a recent letter to the White House, 33 congresswomen endorsed Ms. Rosenworcel as an experienced F.C.C. official who “has spoken openly about how working mothers can be policy leaders.”

She and her husband, Mark I. Bailen, a media lawyer at BakerHostetler, married in 2000 and live with their two children in Washington. They are well-known in the city’s overlapping legal and communications technology circles.

After his wife became the acting chairwoman in January, Mr. Bailen said he resigned as a partner at BakerHostetler and became a salaried employee on the advice of government ethics counsel.

BakerHostetler represents clients with business before the F.C.C. But the firm maintains “an effective firewall that excludes me from any work or any discussion of any work related to the F.C.C.,” Mr. Bailen said in an email.

His high-profile news media clients have included The New York Times and, until late last year, Alex Jones, the Infowars broadcaster who faces a half-dozen defamation lawsuits, including four related to his spreading of conspiracy theories about the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Conn.

In an interview, Ms. Rosenworcel said that First Amendment lawyers like her husband “support the right to free speech, which is not always speech you agree with.”

“We lead very separate professional lives,” she said.

After The Times asked about Mr. Bailen’s work for Mr. Jones and Infowars, he repeatedly contacted The Times’s legal department, raising what he said were the couple’s concerns about fairness and complaining that coverage of his past work could affect his wife’s ability to secure the F.C.C. nomination. An F.C.C. spokeswoman confirmed that Ms. Rosenworcel knew her husband would contact The Times about the article.

The White House screens all potential nominees’ spouses for possible financial conflicts of interest. The Biden administration has brightened that line in an effort to distinguish itself from the ethical lapses of the Trump administration. Last year, Vice President Kamala Harris’s husband, Doug Emhoff, quit a lucrative career at the law and lobbying firm DLA Piper to avoid the appearance of a financial conflict.

“These issues become more pronounced because you’re seeing more gender equity in government,” said Max Stier, the chief executive of Partnership for Public Service, which tracks the appointments process. “There are a bunch of examples like this, and fundamentally, they’re a political choice for the White House.”

As the acting chairwoman, Ms. Rosenworcel has pursued politically uncontroversial initiatives on the evenly split commission, targeting robocalls and working on measures to help wireless networks better withstand severe weather. In February, she proposed using $3.2 billion in pandemic emergency funds to underwrite internet access for low-income households. The Emergency Broadband Benefit program has since surpassed five million enrollees.

Ms. Rosenworcel said a top priority was narrowing the “homework gap,” the educational disadvantage experienced by students who lack internet at home.

“We’re getting a lot done, even though we are shy a member,” she said of the commission. “I’m proud of that record and appreciate that my colleagues have been willing to work with me.”

Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut was among 25 Democratic senators who signed an urgent letter to Mr. Biden last month endorsing Ms. Rosenworcel. The senators said that continued delay in filling the F.C.C. vacancies could hold up the distribution of $65 billion in broadband funding allocated to the F.C.C. and other agencies, and the continuing distribution of $27 billion in pandemic aid aimed at expanding access to the internet for struggling households.

“Given this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to ensure all people have access to broadband, it is absolutely essential that there are trusted, qualified appointees leading these agencies,” the letter read.

A native of Connecticut, Ms. Rosenworcel attended Wesleyan University and New York University Law School. In 2001, she joined the staff of the F.C.C. commissioner Michael Copps, a Democrat, rising to senior adviser.

After six years, Ms. Rosenworcel left the commission for Capitol Hill, serving as the senior counsel to the Senate Commerce Committee. She worked with Senator Jay Rockefeller IV, Democrat of West Virginia, on legislation to address communications problems among emergency workers during the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

“We gained an immense respect for the thoughtfulness and the genuine concern that she had for public safety issues,” said Jeff Johnson, the chief executive of the Western Fire Chiefs Association, who worked with her on plans for the first responders’ network now known as FirstNet. “She became someone we completely trust, and still do.”

Ms. Rosenworcel returned to the F.C.C. in 2011 as President Barack Obama’s nominee to the commission, and she was reappointed by President Donald J. Trump in 2017.

In 2018, while serving on the commission, Ms. Rosenworcel spoke to the National Association of Broadcasters, rallying journalists against Mr. Trump’s attacks on the news media. She said his term “fake news” had reached her dinner table, used as a taunt by one of her children.

“I am stunned at the casualness with which my second grader told his fifth-grade sister to take a hike,” Ms. Rosenworcel said, denouncing how the phrase had “complicated what we believe is true and false, and how that has chilling consequences for those who seek to report — without fear or favor — on the news we need to know.”

When the Republican-dominated commission rolled back net neutrality during the Trump administration, Ms. Rosenworcel was a vocal opponent. Restoring net neutrality is a priority for the Biden administration.

Read More
U.S News

The Student Body Is Deaf and Diverse. The School’s Leadership Is Neither.

More than 30 years after a groundbreaking protest at Gallaudet University in Washington, questions about leadership at a school for the deaf in Atlanta have been further compounded by race.,

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

Supported by

Continue reading the main story

Student protests over the hiring of a white hearing superintendent have roiled a school for the deaf that serves mostly Black and Hispanic students in the Atlanta area and have focused attention on whether school leaders should better reflect the identities of their students.

The Atlanta Area School for the Deaf, run by the Georgia Department of Education, is one of two public schools for the deaf in Georgia and serves roughly 180 students from kindergarten to 12th grade, about 80 percent of whom are Black and Hispanic.

Students protested the hiring, accusing the school and the Education Department of racism and disability-based discrimination against the deaf community known as audism. They noted that the school’s top leadership included no people of color or deaf people.

Two weeks later, the superintendent, Lisa Buckner, who has 22 years of experience as a teacher and administrator of deaf students and had most recently worked at the Education Department, resigned. The school has appointed an interim superintendent, who is also a white hearing woman, and is now searching for a permanent replacement.

The protests echoed a 1988 student uprising at Gallaudet University, the federally chartered private school for the deaf and hard of hearing in Washington. In that protest, which was viewed as a landmark moment for deaf people, students successfully pushed for the university’s first deaf president and drew attention to longstanding challenges faced by deaf people.

Activism since then, including a controversy that saw two officials at Gallaudet resign in 2020 while saying the school discriminated against Black deaf people in hiring and promotions, has increasingly evoked both race and disability. Three decades after the original Gallaudet protest, many in the deaf community say they are still fighting some of the same battles.

The protests in Atlanta followed the hiring of Ms. Buckner in September. She replaced the former superintendent, John Serrano, who resigned in May after four years working as the school’s first deaf Latino leader.

The Atlanta school said it interviewed every applicant who met minimum qualifications for the position. Meghan Frick, a spokeswoman for the Georgia Department of Education, said it “stands opposed to audism and other forms of prejudice.” She described Ms. Buckner as “an educational leader” who was “proficient” in American Sign Language, or A.S.L.

But current and former staff members say deaf employees and people of color were overlooked for promotions, and both staff and students have complained that Ms. Buckner’s knowledge of A.S.L. was poor. In the original job posting, sign language fluency was listed as a preferred, not required, skill.

Image

Trinity Arreola was inspired to speak out against audism and racism at the Atlanta Area School for the Deaf by earlier protests at Gallaudet University. Credit…Kendrick Brinson for The New York Times

Many student protesters felt like the new superintendent could not understand them and looked down on them, according to Trinity Arreola, 18, a protest leader.

“It’s like we’re going backward,” Ms. Arreola, a senior and the president of the Latino Student Union, said. “It’s like we’re going back to a time where deaf people were thought of as limited and incapable.”

The school’s top leadership consists of white hearing women filling the roles of superintendent and assistant principal. In the 2020-21 school year, 79 percent of teachers were white and 60 percent of teachers were hearing, according to Education Department data. Ms. Buckner declined to answer questions about her decision to resign or complaints from students and staff.

Since May, at least 12 other employees have quit the school. Many of those who quit were deaf, people of color, or both, according to one former agriculture teacher, Emily Friedberg, 50, who is white and deaf.

After 12 years working at the school, she said, she was pushed to quit in June — months before she found out who the new superintendent was — because of what she described as a “hostile” environment driven by white hearing leadership that she said “bullied” deaf staff and made inappropriate remarks about students of color.

Ms. Frick said the Education Department was not aware of incidents like these at the school. She said officials encouraged anyone with concerns to reach out to the Education Department leadership.

Image

Emily Friedberg took a job at the Texas School for the Deaf in Austin, Texas, after leaving Atlanta Area School for the Deaf over what she described as a hostile work environment with audism and racism.Credit…Sergio Flores for The New York Times

Though the Gallaudet protest paved the way for new education and employment opportunities for the deaf, schools for the deaf are still mostly led by hearing people and are seldom led by people of color who are deaf.

Of the 73 school leadership positions for 71 statewide K-12 schools for the deaf across the country, 46 are held by hearing people, according to Tawny Holmes Hlibok, a professor of deaf studies at Gallaudet. Among the 27 deaf school leaders — a number that she said has more than doubled from seven years ago — three are people of color.

Growing research shows that students perform better in school if they have role models who reflect their background.

“I notice that when I talk to deaf children at a school without a deaf leader and ask them what they want to be when they grow up, they often limit themselves,” Professor Hlibok said, adding, “When I ask them if they want to be a teacher or lawyer or nurse, they say they can’t because that job is for a hearing person.”

A 2019 report by the National Deaf Center found that 44.8 percent of Black deaf people and 43.6 percent of deaf Native Americans are in the labor force, compared with 59 percent of white deaf people.

Along with a lack of role models, many deaf students, particularly deaf students of color, are not adequately prepared for college because of a lack of early language support services and a lack of certified educational interpreters in public schools, said Laurene E. Simms, interim chief bilingual officer at Gallaudet.

Black deaf students obtain undergraduate, master’s or Ph.D. degrees at about half the rate of Black hearing students, and half the rate of white deaf students, according to another 2019 report by the National Deaf Center.

The loss of so many people of color on the Atlanta school’s staff has made many students feel less comfortable there, according to Katrina Callaway, 19, a senior. In the past, she said, she and her friends have confided in teachers who they can relate to about their problems, home lives and friends, but now “students don’t feel like there’s anyone they can open up to,” she said.

Image

Katrina Callaway said students felt less comfortable at the Atlanta School of the Deaf after the loss of several people of color from the staff.Credit…Kendrick Brinson for The New York Times

“When I try to open up to someone who hasn’t had the same experiences,” she said, “I’m not always sure if I can trust them, and I feel a lot of self-doubt.” She said that sometimes it seemed that white staff treated students differently based on their skin color.

More broadly, activists in recent years have complained about the “whitewashing of disability,” or how much it is largely seen through a white lens, despite statistics that show Black people are more likely to have a disability.

For example, media portrayals of those with disabilities and leadership of disability organizations skew white, according to Vilissa Thompson, a Black disabled activist who created the hashtag #DisabilitySoWhite on Twitter to draw attention to the issue.

Recently, Netflix’s “Deaf U” reality series focusing on Gallaudet College students was criticized for its lack of deaf women of color, even though less than half of the school’s students were white at the time.

Those broader issues raised the stakes at places like the Atlanta school.

Ms. Frick said the Georgia Department of Education was working to create leadership pathways for teachers and school staff.

Mr. Serrano, the previous superintendent, declined to comment on his experience with the Education Department, but he wrote in an email that he hoped the department would conduct an equitable and inclusive search for the next superintendent.

“It is my firm belief that students want and need a leader who ‘looks like them’ and who shares their experiences as deaf and hard of hearing individuals,” he wrote.

Read More
U.S News

Why McAuliffe Isn’t Mentioning Biden in Virginia Governor Race

Terry McAuliffe attacks Trump, but avoids talking about his Democratic ally in the White House — pointing up a vulnerability for the party next Tuesday, and beyond.,

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

Supported by

Continue reading the main story

RESTON, Va. — In Terry McAuliffe’s tough fight for a new term as Virginia’s governor, he has been striving to frame the election as a referendum on a president.

Just not the one who is currently sitting in the Oval Office.

For weeks, Mr. McAuliffe has made little mention of President Biden, instead using his campaign rallies, media interviews and millions of dollars in campaign advertising to make the race all about former President Donald J. Trump.

In a way, Mr. Biden’s scheduled campaign stop with Mr. McAuliffe Tuesday evening, as part of a last-week effort to energize Democratic voters, highlights just how little he has been present in the race at all.

The delicate distance Mr. McAuliffe has put between his campaign and the president, his friend of four decades — whom Mr. McAuliffe helped carry Virginia by 10 points just a year ago — underscores a difficult reality for Democrats looking anxiously ahead to the midterm elections next year. With his moderate, art-of-the-possible politics, Mr. Biden fails to rouse anywhere near the same passions as Mr. Trump, who spurred Democrats to the polls in record numbers throughout his four years in office. Nor has Mr. Biden’s administration given Mr. McAuliffe much to advertise, after months of Democratic infighting on Capitol Hill over the president’s dwindling domestic ambitions.

Rather, in an off-year election with outsize national importance, Mr. Biden has loomed as the unnamed president just offstage: largely ignored in favor of his predecessor, though his own performance is a major factor in the closeness of the race and could play a big role in its outcome.

Democrats reject the idea that the race is a referendum on Mr. Biden’s presidency, but there is widespread acquiescence to the idea that the party’s fortunes are yoked to his standing — a shift in strategy from the 2010 and 2014 midterms, when a number of Democratic candidates for competitive seats distanced themselves from former President Barack Obama. This, in turn, has sent waves of anxiety through Democratic circles, as lawmakers prepare for what are expected to be difficult congressional campaigns in 2022.

“I don’t know if it’s a referendum on Biden, exactly — it’s just a general feeling of not understanding why nothing can get done,” said John Morgan, a Florida trial lawyer and top donor to both Mr. Biden and Mr. McAuliffe. He said he largely blamed congressional Democrats for the tightening of the Virginia race.

“The party is single-handedly torpedoing Terry McAuliffe,” Mr. Morgan said. “And I think that if Terry loses, Democrats just need to grab a hold of themselves, because the midterms are going to be a blood bath.”

Virginia’s off-year elections do not always accurately foreshadow the midterm results: Mr. McAuliffe won in 2013, defying the state’s pattern of electing a governor from the party that does not hold the White House, yet Republicans won the midterms the following year. And many fatigued Democratic voters now simply want to tune out national politics altogether.

But strategists in both parties say Mr. Biden’s early struggles and the lack of enthusiasm around his presidency could be a decisive factor.

“The overriding factor in the environment is not Donald Trump, it’s Biden’s approval rating,” said Tucker Martin, a Republican strategist in Richmond who voted for Mr. Biden but plans to support Glenn Youngkin, a Republican and former private equity executive, over Mr. McAuliffe. “Both these candidates, they’re really captive to the national political environment. That’s the reality.”

Advisers to Mr. McAuliffe note that his contest with Mr. Youngkin tightened at the end of the summer, just as Mr. Biden’s approval rating began to fall, as the president’s promise of a return to normalcy faltered in the face of the Delta variant, chaos on the southern border and the tumultuous withdrawal from Afghanistan.

But they see hopeful signs in the fact that Mr. McAuliffe’s support remains higher than Mr. Biden’s approval rating, which hovers in the low to mid-40s — lower than that of any president than Mr. Trump at this early stage.

Image

Mr. Biden, left, campaigned for Mr. McAuliffe in the summer around the time that the race tightened and Mr. Biden’s approval ratings fell.Credit…Pete Marovich for The New York Times

Mr. Biden’s declining approval ratings among core Democratic constituencies, including young, Latino and Black voters, could inhibit turnout efforts for Mr. McAuliffe, complicating his path to victory in a race that could hinge on which candidate best mobilizes his base.

Swing voters in the suburbs have gotten over their early excitement about replacing Mr. Trump, said Christine Matthews, a Republican pollster who has run focus groups about the Virginia contest. While Mr. Biden’s victory at first inspired “ginormous relief,” she said, “Now, there’s a realization like, Oh, yeah, Biden’s not perfect, and things aren’t feeling enormously better.”

Neither Mr. McAuliffe nor Mr. Youngkin has mentioned Mr. Biden in his ads, according to AdImpact, which tracks campaign commercials, underscoring how little he motivates voters in either party — a striking change after many years in which sitting presidents routinely played starring roles in advertisements by candidates in both parties.

In the closing weeks of the race, Mr. McAuliffe, who served a term as governor from 2014 to 2018 but was barred from a second consecutive term by Virginia law, has tried to put some daylight between his campaign and Mr. Biden’s administration. Though he never directly criticizes the president, Mr. McAuliffe has repeatedly highlighted the political risk posed by congressional inaction on the president’s legislative agenda. In private conversations with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and the White House, allies of Mr. McAuliffe say he has argued that the souring national environment is hurting his chances.

“We are facing a lot of headwinds from Washington,” Mr. McAuliffe, a former chairman of the Democratic National Committee, said during a virtual call with supporters this month. “As you know, the president is unpopular today, unfortunately, here in Virginia, so we have got to plow through.”

Mr. McAuliffe downplayed the remark, saying he was referring to a general sense of frustration with inaction in Washington. But it was a sharp departure from earlier in the race when Mr. McAuliffe predicted his state would “take off like a booster rocket” if he was elected governor and could work with Mr. Biden.

The tonal shift is particularly striking, given the long friendship between the two men and the similarities in their political brands as experienced party insiders with centrist leanings. Mr. McAuliffe declined to run for president in April 2019 after a three-hour dinner with Mr. Biden during which the future president laid out his path to victory — one based on the same kind of consensus-oriented platform that Mr. McAuliffe had envisioned for himself.

“I love the guy,” Mr. McAuliffe said of Mr. Biden at the time. “I’m a big fan.”

Mr. Biden’s promises to move past polarizing politics helped him win the White House, offering a refuge for voters tired of the turbulence of the Trump era. Now, however, at a moment when Democrats need to marshal their forces, the prospect of calm leadership and a diminished agenda may not be so enticing to his Democratic base.

Wes Bellamy, a co-chair of Our Black Party, which promotes the political priorities of Black voters, said Mr. Biden was not inspiring the same sort of loyalty from Black voters that Mr. Obama did.

“Black folks came out in droves for the Biden administration,” said Mr. Bellamy, a former Charlottesville city councilman who was named to a statewide education post during Mr. McAuliffe’s first term. “And there has been a lot of people who really feel the administration hasn’t delivered on many of the things they wish they did.”

To animate Democrats, Mr. McAuliffe has spent millions tying Mr. Youngkin to Mr. Trump, portraying the former president as a grave and continuing threat to democracy and to Democratic values like abortion rights.

But some party strategists say it is not enough for Democrats to campaign on what they can block; with control of Congress and the White House, they need to be able to run on what they have accomplished.

“The lack of base intensity is based on Democrats not delivering, after people spent four years resisting Trump and getting Democratic majorities,” said Tom Perriello, a Virginia Democrat who lost his seat in Congress after supporting Mr. Obama’s health care law in 2010 and blamed congressional moderates for stalling passage of Mr. Biden’s legislative agenda.

Yet some Democrats worry that any distinction between the president and the party’s dueling factions in Congress will be lost on voters.

“In America we’ve loved to shoot the messenger, and the messenger is always the president,” said Mr. Morgan, the Democratic donor. “We can’t shoot Trump. He’s gone. So you can either blame Biden or God.”

Read More
sugar-daddies-usa how to find sugar daddy

Just How Direct Is Actually Aubrey Plaza And That Which Works Was She Best-known For?

Just How Direct Is Actually Aubrey Plaza And That Which Works Was She Best-known For?

Talking about artists who happen to be prolific through the movie market, North american celebrity jizz performer Aubrey Plaza is deserving of a resonant declare. After an intern who caused NBC a few years in return, Plaza has dropped the cloak of a newcomer actress and missing in advance generate a distinct segment for herself inside the highly competitive field of showbiz.

Aubrey Plaza will for a long time generally be remembered to be with her function as April Ludgate regarding the NBC sitcom park & Rec, among various other preferred production she has under this lady strip.

Aubrey Plaza Created Her Job As An Intern

The test sensation would be only an intern whenever the girl career when you look at the performing arts took off. The American-born actor experienced a number of internships, function as an NBC web page and executing improv and sketch drama since 2004 inside the standing residents Brigade theatre.

Read More
easy online payday loans

helping our personal developer business get real house and home mortgages to finance their own personal responsibilities you develop utilize

helping our personal developer business get real house and home mortgages to finance their own personal responsibilities you develop utilize

Charleston Area Solicitors

Real estate prices and connected strategies are among the actual largest and a lot of essential wealth that businesses and people produce in marketplace At and most of us hold your own home savings and job are handled easily with the utmost awareness to help you in hitting your aims and targets.

All of our applied housing solicitors have actually really showed residential and professional housing customers dealers developers landlords people and creditors close to 4 decades Our very own genuine class can capture difficult to make sure an easy purchase getting a focus on personal clients solutions and concentrated help and support.

Our actual house completion attorneys can help with produce and deciding lawful contracts design shutting reports evaluating topic function supplying subject insurance costs through several larger nationwide subject insurance vendors as well as we can feature genuine the courtroom generating litigation corporate laws and solution challenge resolution you furthermore get expertise in needed research difficulty ecological burden title deed and different issues during payment and use the entire procured items your team supply all the support reliance on summary.

Read More
top payday loans

having received actually articulated, distinguished promoting points, a powerful history

having received actually articulated, distinguished promoting points, a powerful history

The earth’s leading managers make his / her incorporated marketing and sales communications.

Even the many observation that’s arresting The Economist report is that mid sized owners described as those beyond the main with le compared to demand remove last his/her key offering, piece expense, and provide less items, and refocus on types where in fact the manager features a the opportunity to generally be special. The scrub, but, is the fact this type of program this is strong not very likely to be been thankful for since established individuals are more likely to keep positioned, permitting regular corporations obtain gain benefit from the metal rule of inertia.

Nevertheless regardless of the reality numerous mid and boutique sized professionals brings away regarding it, tomorrow is a little most probably be established on the striking, those that include an exceptional way. Undoubtedly, grams testimonial find several this sort of managers Baillie Gifford and Global procedures that don’t rank throughout the very top by but defeat even larger family completely given that they utilize to successfully feature an investment proposition which separated.

Read More
sugar-daddies profile search

“that isn’t true. You usually need work on your union.”

“that isn’t true. You usually need work on your union.”

Talk tv show variety and popular creator Dr. Phil McGraw is acknowledged for their no-nonsense style. There’s an abundance of that on display within his second prime-time special, “Romance relief.”

From the program, he attempts to help romantically pushed lovers and singles switch items about.

An example try a stylish, successful lady who’s got no challenge getting earliest times, but hardly ever is necesary one minute.

Th tv show in fact tapes the girl on a romantic date, then reveals the tape to the lady and a panel of men. McGraw then guides the woman through another go out, with an earpiece she wears so she can listen to his advice.

McGraw says she had been “very attractive in terms of the girl styles, the lady characteristics, the woman cleverness, this lady traditions. Nevertheless the issue is, occasionally, it actually leaves no place for men. A guy satisfy this lady and is also thus overloaded so intimidated by the girl competence, it is like, ‘You will find absolutely nothing to supply this lady.’ So that they pull back.”

How come she delivering incorrect indicators on schedules?

“i believe,” McGraw states, “it’s to get safe. Clearly, she actually is in a male-dominated business, in profit. She’s competitive with males all the time. To be susceptible, so that all of them become close, is frightening to the woman. She actually is got to point off of the difference in the work globe therefore the not-work community.”

What is a large error singles make in seeking relations?

“To begin with,” McGraw claims, “is we enter it often with impractical objectives. In my opinion you’ll want to understand that the connection are a building thing. It’s a slow turn. . Most of us have this “power dating,” surviving in the laser way.

Read More
no teletrack payday loans

the majority of people execute all of our research to make certain that your an exemplary selection for credit. Blindly

the majority of people execute all of our research to make certain that your an exemplary selection for credit. Blindly

Obtain A Jobless Obligations On The Web in Ontario From Fantastic Money

You are between job and cash is quick. Maybe you are receiving severance or work plans, yet it is lack of to get to know your own personal typical bills, as well as those unexpected problems which could harm earnings definitely previously risky.

Read More
U.S News

Tir mortel d’Alec Baldwin: quelle responsabilité a l’assistant réalisateur?

L’enquête se penche sur les failles sécuritaires et la possible responsabilité de l’assistant réalisateur Dave Hills dans la mort par tir d’arme de la directrice de la photographie sur le tournage d’un western.,

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

Supported by

Continue reading the main story

The New York Times traduit une sélection de ses meilleurs articles pour un lectorat francophone. Retrouvez-les ici.

ALBUQUERQUE — Le coup de feu qu’a tiré Alec Baldwin pendant le tournage du western a touché la directrice de la photographie et le réalisateur. Dans la panique qui s’empare de l’équipe, Mamie Mitchell, une secrétaire de plateau, passe un appel frénétique au numéro d’urgence 911.

“Deux personnes viennent d’être accidentellement blessées sur un plateau de tournage”, dit-elle à l’opérateur. Puis elle désigne l’assistant réalisateur du film comme la personne responsable de veiller à ce qu’un accident pareil ne produise jamais. “Il est censé vérifier les armes”, insiste-t-elle au téléphone.

Depuis le décès de Halyna Hutchins, la directrice de la photographie de 42 ans, des suites de la fusillade de jeudi, les enquêteurs du bureau du shérif du comté de Santa Fe portent leur attention sur le rôle que l’assistant réalisateur Dave Halls, parmi d’autres personnes sur le plateau, a pu jouer dans la tragédie. D’après les documents judiciaires, Alec Baldwin s’est vu dire par Halls, lorsque cet dernier lui a tendu l’arme à feu, qu’il s’agissait d’une “arme froide”. Une arme à feu “froide” sur un plateau de tournage désigne une arme non chargée.

Les enquêteurs n’ont encore inculpé personne, ni désigné de fautif dans cette tragédie. Ils n’ont pas non plus précisé quel type de projectile a tué Halyna Hutchins.

Dave Halls, un vétéran de la profession qui a travaillé sur des films comme que “Fargo” et “Matrix Reloaded”, fait depuis quelques années l’objet de plaintes dans le milieu du cinéma quant à sa supervision de la sécurité des plateaux. Ces plaintes, qui tournent en grande partie autour de questions de non-respect des protocoles de sécurité ainsi que de son comportement sur les plateaux, alimentent maintenant les interrogations sur le tournage au Nouveau-Mexique. Deux tirs accidentels d’armes à feu avaient déjà eu lieu quelques jours avant la fusillade mortelle.

“Dave ne suit pas toujours les règles”, affirme la réalisatrice Antonia Bogdanovich, qui a travaillé avec Halls sur la série policière “Phantom Halo”. Elle raconte comment Halls, assistant réalisateur sur ce film-là, avait fait pression sur l’équipe pour qu’elle travaille au-delà des horaires convenus, provoquant de fortes tensions.

Dave Halls n’a pas répondu à plusieurs tentatives de le joindre.

Le tournage de “Rust”, le western bouleversé par la fusillade, avait déjà été essaimé d’incidents. Quelques heures seulement avant l’épisode tragique, six membres de l’équipe caméra avaient quitté le tournage en raison de retards dans le versement de leur paie et des conditions de travail imposées. Antonia Bogdanovich se dit très préoccupée d’apprendre non seulement l’existence de ces conflits sociaux, mais aussi que, selon la déclaration sous serment, c’est Dave Halls qui a tendu à Alec Baldwin l’arme à l’origine du coup tiré sur Halyna Hutchins.

Image

Des chandelles ont été allumées samedi soir à Albuquerque en hommage à Halyna Hutchins.Credit…Sharon Chischilly for The New York Times

“Je suis réalisatrice de films, et ce que je sais, c’est qu’avant qu’on remette une arme à feu à un acteur, il y a forcément plusieurs étapes”, explique-t-elle. “Avant de dire que l’arme était ‘froide’, Dave Halls devait la vérifier. Il devait ouvrir la culasse et vérifier.”

Le détective chargé de l’enquête, Joel Cano, indique dans son rapport que Doug Halls a saisi l’un de trois pistolets fournis par l’armurière du tournage Hannah Gutierrez-Reed. Les armes étaient posées sur un chariot placé à l’extérieur d’une construction en bois en raison des restrictions du Covid-19, selon le détective, et que Halls en a remis une à M. Baldwin au moment de répétiter une scène. Hannah Gutierrez-Reed n’a pas fait suite à nos demandes de commentaires.

What Happened on the Set of “Rust”

What We Know: After the actor Alec Baldwin discharged a gun that was being used as a prop on the set of the movie “Rust,” killing the film’s director of photography and wounding the director, Hollywood was in a state of shock. Here is what we know about the episode.Remembering the Victim: Friends of Halyna Hutchins, the cinematographer who died in the shooting, described her as a spirited and talented woman who was proud of her Ukrainian heritage.Safety Measures: Real firearms are routinely used while cameras are rolling. Here is how crews minimize the risks and ensure safety.Other Accidents on Set: Deaths and injuries on movie and television sets have occurred with some regularity over the last decades, this partial list of set accidents shows.

Ces révélations éclairent la manière dont les armes sont censées être manipulées sur les plateaux de tournage. Des armuriers professionnels experts en maniement des armes expliquent que leur travail consiste à fournir celles-ci et à s’assurer qu’elles peuvent être utilisées en toute sécurité. Les assistants réalisateurs, quant à eux, sont censés les inspecter et verifier qu’elles ne sont pas chargées. En règle générale, c’est l’armurier qui remet ensuite l’arme au comédien.

Larry Zanoff, expert en usage d’armes à feu sur les tournages de films — il était notamment l’armurier de “Django Unchained”, de Quentin Tarantino — souligne que c’est le premier assistant réalisateur, d’après les normes de la profession, qui est le principal chargé de la sécurité sur un plateau. Généralement, c’est lui qui inspecte une arme pour vérifier qu’elle n’est pas chargée et qu’elle peut être manipulée en toute sécurité.

Lisa Long, qui a travaillé avec Dave Halls comme première assistante caméra sur un tournage au début de l’année, relate qu’elle s’y était plainte à plusieurs reprises auprès de ses supérieurs de ce qu’elle percevait comme l’absence de véritables réunions de sécurité et qu’elle leur avait fait part de ses inquiétudes quant à des violations des règles sanitaires liées à la Covid-19.

“Normalement, c’est au premier assistant réalisateur que je parle des problème de sécurité”, dit Lisa Long, faisant référence à la fonction qu’occupait Dave Halls, “mais c’est justement le premier assistant réalisateur que ces problèmes de sécurité concernaient.”

Elle ajoute que pour le film “One Way”, avec Machine Gun Kelly et Travis Fimmel, l’équipe avait tourné une scène sur une autoroute active sans y avoir été correctement préparée, et que deux de leurs véhicules avaient de justesse évité un accident.

“Je ne me souviens d’aucune réunion de sécurité digne de ce nom”, souligne-t-elle au sujet de la production.

Dans un communiqué rendu public dimanche, Maggie Goll, une pyrotechnicienne agréée qui travaille sur des plateaux de télévision, fait écho à ces propos en affirmant qu’en 2019, Dave Halls “ne maintenait pas un environnement de travail sûr” alors qu’il était premier assistant réalisateur sur la série d’horreur “Into the Dark” de Hulu.

D’après sa déclaration rapportée par CNN, les réunions de sécurité étaient “inexistantes” sur le plateau. Goll cite un épisode particuler au cours duquel Hall et un autre membre de l’équipe de production avaient fait pression pour reprendre le tournage alors qu’un collègue pyrotechnicien souffrait d’une crise de diabète nécessitant une urgence médicale.

“J’ai tenu bon face à Dave qui n’arrêtait pas d’insister qu’on reprenne le tournage”, écrit-elle. Maggie Goll dit qu’elle a rapporté cette situation à Blumhouse Television, la société de production, ainsi qu’à la Directors Guild of America, ou D.G.A., principal syndicat de réalisateurs de films aux États-Unis.

D’après un communiqué de Blumhouse, Dave Halls a travaillé sur deux films de la série “Into the Dark” et n’a pas été réembauché depuis. Toujours selon le communiquée, toutes les plaintes reçues par le studio relatives à des questions de sécurité ont été “traitées rapidement”. La D.G.A., dont Dave Halls est membre, n’a pas fait suite à une demande de commentaire.

Clay Van Sickle, un armurier de l’industrie cinématographique qui a aussi travaillé sur le plateau d’“Into the Dark”, dit être au courant des plaintes déposées par Maggie Goll, mais affirme que lui-même n’a pas eu de problème avec M. Halls sur le tournage. Il souligne qu’une certaine culture de la précipitation et de la réduction des coûts de production prévaut dans le cinéma en général, et que c’est à l’armurier d’y résister.

Sur “Rust” comme pour n’importe quel film, selon M. Van Sickle, la possession de l’arme doit passer directement de l’armurier au comédien. Ce qui n’a apparemment pas été le cas, à en croire la séquence décrite dans le rapport. “Sur tellement de points, le protocole n’a clairement pas été suivi”, déplore-t-il.

Read More
U.S News

White House to Name Rosenworcel as F.C.C.’s First Female Leader

Jessica Rosenworcel, the acting chairwoman of the powerful regulator, campaigned vigorously for a permanent appointment.,

Advertisement

Continue reading the main story

Supported by

Continue reading the main story

President Biden is expected to nominate Jessica Rosenworcel, the acting chairwoman of the Federal Communications Commission, to the permanent job this week, putting her on track to become the first woman to lead the agency, a person familiar with the process said.

If she is confirmed by the Senate, Ms. Rosenworcel would lead an agency whose responsibilities include ensuring that millions of Americans have internet access. The F.C.C. promotes competition among providers, scrutinizes mergers between telecommunications and broadcast companies, and regulates communications by radio, television, wire, satellite and cable.

The nomination reflects the Biden administration’s commitment to restoring net neutrality rules, which promote competition in part by barring internet providers from blocking certain content, slowing its delivery or letting clients pay more to have it delivered faster. The F.C.C. adopted the rules during the Obama administration but rolled them back under the Trump administration.

A person familiar with the process confirmed that Mr. Biden was expected to announce Ms. Rosenworcel’s nomination later on Tuesday. The person spoke on the condition of anonymity to discuss internal deliberations.

The president has come under growing pressure in recent weeks to fill two open spots at the F.C.C.: the permanent leader of the agency and the seat on the five-member commission that Ms. Rosenworcel vacated when she became the acting chairwoman.

Both positions must be confirmed by the Senate, a process plagued by delays and political gamesmanship. If Ms. Rosenworcel and the next member of the commission are not confirmed before the end of the year, Republicans could gain a de facto majority. The commission is currently deadlocked, with two Democratic and two Republican members.

“There’s no historical precedent and pretty wide frustration from the consumer side that we haven’t had an agency able to do anything about something as important to people’s lives as broadband access,” said Ernesto Falcon, the senior legislative counsel at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, a public-interest law firm working on digital civil liberties. The group has pushed the F.C.C. to move faster on expanding access to underserved communities, a goal that has taken on increased urgency during the coronavirus pandemic.

“When you have wide-scale monopolization on broadband access and a sidelined agency, clearly it’s the industry that benefits,” Mr. Falcon said.

Though the F.C.C.’s actions directly affect companies making up one-sixth of the U.S. economy, it has no authority over communications on social media, where rampant political misinformation has made the big platforms a regulatory priority.

When asked in an interview why she wanted to lead the commission, Ms. Rosenworcel said, “It’s the future of our economy, and I think we have to make sure across the board that women are represented, including at the top.”

Ms. Rosenworcel, 50, campaigned vigorously for the permanent job, with female members of Congress, five labor unions, 14 human rights groups and two dozen Senate Democrats lobbying Mr. Biden to nominate her. In a recent letter to the White House, 33 congresswomen endorsed Ms. Rosenworcel as an experienced F.C.C. official who “has spoken openly about how working mothers can be policy leaders.”

She and her husband, Mark I. Bailen, a media lawyer at BakerHostetler, married in 2000 and live with their two children in Washington. They are well-known in the city’s overlapping legal and communications technology circles.

After his wife became the acting chairwoman in January, Mr. Bailen said he resigned as a partner at BakerHostetler and became a salaried employee on the advice of government ethics counsel.

BakerHostetler represents clients with business before the F.C.C. But the firm maintains “an effective firewall that excludes me from any work or any discussion of any work related to the F.C.C.,” Mr. Bailen said in an email.

His high-profile news media clients have included The New York Times and, until late last year, Alex Jones, the Infowars broadcaster who faces a half-dozen defamation lawsuits, including four related to his spreading of conspiracy theories about the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown, Conn.

In an interview, Ms. Rosenworcel said that First Amendment lawyers like her husband “support the right to free speech, which is not always speech you agree with.”

“We lead very separate professional lives,” she said.

After The Times asked about Mr. Bailen’s work for Mr. Jones and Infowars, he repeatedly contacted The Times’s legal department, raising what he said were the couple’s concerns about fairness and complaining that coverage of his past work could affect his wife’s ability to secure the F.C.C. nomination. An F.C.C. spokeswoman confirmed that Ms. Rosenworcel knew her husband would contact The Times about the article.

The White House screens all potential nominees’ spouses for possible financial conflicts of interest. The Biden administration has brightened that line in an effort to distinguish itself from the ethical lapses of the Trump administration. Last year, Vice President Kamala Harris’s husband, Doug Emhoff, quit a lucrative career at the law and lobbying firm DLA Piper to avoid the appearance of a financial conflict.

“These issues become more pronounced because you’re seeing more gender equity in government,” said Max Stier, the chief executive of Partnership for Public Service, which tracks the appointments process. “There are a bunch of examples like this, and fundamentally, they’re a political choice for the White House.”

As the acting chairwoman, Ms. Rosenworcel has pursued politically uncontroversial initiatives on the evenly split commission, targeting robocalls and working on measures to help wireless networks better withstand severe weather. In February, she proposed using $3.2 billion in pandemic emergency funds to underwrite internet access for low-income households. The Emergency Broadband Benefit program has since surpassed five million enrollees.

Ms. Rosenworcel said a top priority was narrowing the “homework gap,” the educational disadvantage experienced by students who lack internet at home.

“We’re getting a lot done, even though we are shy a member,” she said of the commission. “I’m proud of that record and appreciate that my colleagues have been willing to work with me.”

Senator Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut was among 25 Democratic senators who signed an urgent letter to Mr. Biden last month endorsing Ms. Rosenworcel. The senators said that continued delay in filling the F.C.C. vacancies could hold up the distribution of $65 billion in broadband funding allocated to the F.C.C. and other agencies, and the continuing distribution of $27 billion in pandemic aid aimed at expanding access to the internet for struggling households.

“Given this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to ensure all people have access to broadband, it is absolutely essential that there are trusted, qualified appointees leading these agencies,” the letter read.

A native of Connecticut, Ms. Rosenworcel attended Wesleyan University and New York University Law School. In 2001, she joined the staff of the F.C.C. commissioner Michael Copps, a Democrat, rising to senior adviser.

After six years, Ms. Rosenworcel left the commission for Capitol Hill, serving as the senior counsel to the Senate Commerce Committee. She worked with Senator Jay Rockefeller IV, Democrat of West Virginia, on legislation to address communications problems among emergency workers during the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

“We gained an immense respect for the thoughtfulness and the genuine concern that she had for public safety issues,” said Jeff Johnson, the chief executive of the Western Fire Chiefs Association, who worked with her on plans for the first responders’ network now known as FirstNet. “She became someone we completely trust, and still do.”

Ms. Rosenworcel returned to the F.C.C. in 2011 as President Barack Obama’s nominee to the commission, and she was reappointed by President Donald J. Trump in 2017.

In 2018, while serving on the commission, Ms. Rosenworcel spoke to the National Association of Broadcasters, rallying journalists against Mr. Trump’s attacks on the news media. She said his term “fake news” had reached her dinner table, used as a taunt by one of her children.

“I am stunned at the casualness with which my second grader told his fifth-grade sister to take a hike,” Ms. Rosenworcel said, denouncing how the phrase had “complicated what we believe is true and false, and how that has chilling consequences for those who seek to report — without fear or favor — on the news we need to know.”

When the Republican-dominated commission rolled back net neutrality during the Trump administration, Ms. Rosenworcel was a vocal opponent. Restoring net neutrality is a priority for the Biden administration.

Read More